Tag Archives: History of John D Hutchison

King of Hong Kong: John D Hutchison

Douglas Clague built Hutchison into one of the largest trading houses in Hong Kong.

John Duflon Hutchison (1855 – 1920) established John D Hutchison & Co, a Hong Kong trading house, in 1877.

Thomas Ernest Pearce (1883 – 1941) joined the firm in 1903, and acquired a controlling stake from 1917.

Philip Stanley Cassidy (1889 – 1971), brother-in-law to Pearce, entered the partnership from 1922.

Pearce was killed in action during the Battle of Hong Kong in 1941, and Cassidy became the chairman of the firm.

John Douglas “Duggie” Clague (1917 – 1981) was born in Bulawayo, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and raised on the Isle of Man. He originally worked as a bank clerk.

Clague served in the British Army in Hong Kong during the Second World War. He was captured when the Japanese invaded, and held in a prisoner of war camp. With three others, including John Pearce (1918 – 2017), the son of Thomas Pearce, he made a daring escape into China. There he joined, with Pearce, the British Army Aid Group, a MI9 unit assisting POWs to flee Japanese internment camps.

By the end of the war Clague was a Colonel honoured with a Military Cross and a CBE. He returned to Hong Kong in 1947 with a sterling reputation and an excellent network of acquaintances.

Presumably aided by an introduction from John Pearce, Clague was appointed deputy to P S Cassidy. At the time John D Hutchison & Co focused on importing and exporting, and was dwarfed by the Hong Kong trading houses of Jardine Matheson and Wheelock Marden.

Cassidy retired in 1952, and Clague became chairman of John D Hutchison. He would develop the company into a business with international scope.

Clague bought out a 50 percent stake in J D Hutchison owned by Wheelock Marden in 1963. He renamed the company Hutchison International, and embarked upon the acquisition trail.

A S Watson, with interests in soft drinks, was acquired in 1965. Other acquisitions included Davie Boag, a specialised trader, and Oriental Pacific Mills, a textiles business.

Hutchinson gained control of Hong Kong & Whampoa Dock Company, one of the largest companies in Hong Kong, in 1969. Clague found that in the midst of China’s cultural revolution and riots in Hong Kong, assets could be acquired at a relative discount.

Following the takeovers Clague confidently proclaimed in 1969 that Hutchison was now the largest trading house in Hong Kong. The Financial Times described Clague as “one of Hong Kong’s most remarkable entrepreneurs” in 1974. He boasted, “I am Hong Kong’s Rock of Gibraltar”.

Hutchison encountered cash flow problems in 1975 due to heavy losses at an Indonesian subsidiary, high-risk financial speculations and overpayment of directors. It was rescued by the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank (HSBC), who acquired a one third stake in the company. Clague was forced to relinquish his executive responsibilities.

HSBC sold its stake to Li Ka-shing (born 1928) in 1979.

Clague died in 1981 following a battle with cancer.

Hutchison remains one of the largest companies in Hong Kong, and Clague deserves credit for having faith in the Hong Kong economy and building the company into what it is today.